PG&E Says Federal Judge's Safety Plan Is Not Feasible And Too Expensive

Attorneys for utility giant Pacific Gas and Electric say a federal court proposal to require the company to enact a major fire-prevention program could cost as much as $150 billion dollars and the removal of 100 million trees from Northern California. Two weeks ago, Judge William Alsup proposed ordering the utility to inspect its entire electric grid — almost 100,000 miles of power lines — to determine the safety of that system and "remove or trim all trees that could fall onto its power...

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Trump's Ex-Attorney Cohen Postpones Hill Testimony, Citing Ongoing 'Threats'

Updated at 3:42 p.m. ET President Trump's former personal attorney Michael Cohen has postponed the public testimony he planned to give next month to the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, citing "threats" from Trump. A lawyer for Cohen said on Wednesday that "ongoing threats" against Cohen's family from the president and his attorney, Rudy Giuliani, "as well as Mr. Cohen's cooperation with ongoing investigations," had prompted him to decide not to appear as planned. Trump told...

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ieunited.org

The local political advocacy group IE United is suing the San Bernardino County Board of Supervisors over the process that four superviors used to appoint a fifth supervisor to a vacancy.  IE United contends the process supervisors used violated state law.  Who is this group, IE United?  KVCR's Benjamin Purper has this profile.

greetingsfromthesaltonsea.com

Thousands of migrating birds have died at the Salton Sea this month.  Officials say they believe it is the result of an avian bacterial disease  KVCR's Ken Vincent has more.

scholastic.com via mygc.com/au

The California Legislature and new Governor Gavin Newsom are negotiating budget proposals on child poverty and juyvenile justice.  More in these reports from KVCR's Ken Vincent and Capital Public Radio's Drew Sandsor.

Man Accused Of Starting Holy Fire Pleads Not Guilty

Jan 22, 2019

SANTA ANA (CNS) - A man accused of igniting the Holy Fire that
blackened 23,000 acres in Riverside and Orange counties pleaded not guilty
today.
   Forrest Gordon Clark, 51, faces felony charges of aggravated arson
damaging at least five inhabited structures, arson of inhabited property, arson
of forest and making criminal threats. He is accused of setting the Holy Fire,
which began in the Holy Jim Canyon area on Aug. 6 and wasn't fully contained
until Sept. 13.
   The blaze forced the evacuation of thousands of residents and

You Tube

Gusty winds are expected to continue today (Tuesday) in parts of the Inland Empire, including the valleys ... the mountains and the San
Gorgonio Pass near Banning. A National Weather Service wind advisory will
remain in effect through noon tomorrow in all three areas. The Coachella Valley
is not included in the wind advisory. The National Weather Service says
powerful winds could whip up sand and dust and create potentially hazardous
driving conditions ... especially for high-profile vehicles. Officials are

KPBS

An Inland Empire Democratic newcomer who ran for election last year against San Diego-area Republican Member of Congress Duncan Hunter says he'll run for the 50th Congressional District seat again.  More from KVCR's Ken Vincent.

Disney ABC Press

California U.S. Senator Kamala Harris announced yesterday that she's running for president in 2020.  But some news anchors and pundits still can't pronounce the Democrat's first name.  Capital Public Radio's PolitiFact reporter Chris Nichols checked out all of the wrong ways... and the correct one. 

PG&E

PG&E's bankruptcy continues to spur questions on how the path forward will affect California's electricity distriution, customers, and wildfire victims.  Capital Public Radio's Randol White has some insights from experts familiar with the situation.

A small number of Americans have figured out a way to do what seems impossible these days: live without a bank account.  But disasters, like November's deadly wildfire in Paradise, wreak havok on people's normal routines.  Capital Public Radio's Pauline Bartolone talked to displaced Butte County residents about how being unbanked has complicated their recovery.

Beyonce Mass At Univ. of Redlands

Jan 21, 2019
University of Redlands

It's the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday, a fitting day to celebrate a Beyonce Mass. KVCR's David Fleming reports.

Click the link below for more of Rev. Norton's work and other activities connected to her visit to UOR: 

 https://www.redlands.edu/bulldog-blog/2019/january-2019/u-of-r-to-host-groundbreaking-beyonce-mass/

Pages

Just In From NPR:

Attorneys for utility giant Pacific Gas and Electric say a federal court proposal to require the company to enact a major fire-prevention program could cost as much as $150 billion dollars and the removal of 100 million trees from Northern California.

Sir David Attenborough spoke at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, this week, warning that human-caused climate change has drastically altered the world in his lifetime. “The Garden of Eden is no more,” he said, urging the leaders gathered there to work on solving the problems of climate change.

As of Tuesday in San Francisco, Starbucks is available for delivery via the Uber Eats app. Starbucks plans to debut the service in New York, Boston, Chicago, Los Angeles and Washington, D.C., over the next few weeks, charging a $2.49 flat delivery fee for access to 95 percent of its menu.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young talks with Sam Oches (@SamQSR), editorial director of Food News Media.

Updated at 3:42 p.m. ET

President Trump's former personal attorney Michael Cohen has postponed the public testimony he planned to give next month to the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, citing "threats" from Trump.

A lawyer for Cohen said on Wednesday that "ongoing threats" against Cohen's family from the president and his attorney, Rudy Giuliani, "as well as Mr. Cohen's cooperation with ongoing investigations," had prompted him to decide not to appear as planned.

More From NPR

House Oversight Panel Launches Inquiry Into White House Security Clearances

House Oversight Committee Democrats have launched an investigation into who got security clearances in President Trump's administration following the 2016 election, as well as how and why. Chairman Elijah Cummings, D-Md., outlined the goals of his inquiry in a letter to the White House on Wednesday. The committee wants "to determine why the White House and transition team appear to have disregarded established procedures for safeguarding classified information" and "evaluate the extent to...

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Arizona Police Arrest Nurse Suspected Of Impregnating Incapacitated Woman

Updated at 2:44 p.m. ET Police in Phoenix say they have arrested a man suspected of assaulting and impregnating an incapacitated woman who gave birth at a long-term care facility. Nathan Sutherland, 36, a licensed practical nurse has been charged with one count of sexual assault and one count of vulnerable adult abuse, according to officials who made the announcement at a news conference Wednesday. "[Police] have spent endless hours investigating this hideous crime," Interim Mayor Thelda...

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California Doctors Alarmed As State Links Their Opioid Prescriptions to Deaths

About a year ago, Dr. Ako Jacintho of San Francisco returned home from traveling to find a letter from the state medical board waiting for him. The letter explained that a patient he had treated died in 2012 from taking a toxic cocktail of methadone and Benadryl — and Jacintho was the doctor who wrote the patient's last prescription for methadone. He had two weeks to respond with a written summary of the care he had provided, and a certified copy of the patient's medical record. He faced...

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Pelosi To Trump: House Won't Host State Of The Union Until Shutdown Ends

Updated at 4:25 p.m. ET President Trump promised to find an alternative setting for his State of the Union address, after House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., insisted he could not speak on the House floor until a partial government shutdown is over. The president and the speaker traded barbed letters Wednesday, with Trump initially saying he wanted to deliver the speech next Tuesday in the House chamber — the traditional location. "It would be so very sad for our Country if the State of the...

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Native American Leader: 'A Wall Is Not The Answer'

For one Native American tribe whose land straddles the U.S.-Mexico border, President Trump's proposed border wall would, literally, divide its people. The Tohono O'odham Nation stretches through the desert from just south of Casa Grande in southern Arizona to the U.S. border — and then beyond, into the Mexican state of Sonora. This means that if Trump gets his $5.7 billion border wall, it would cut right through the tribe's land. "It would be as if I walked into your home and felt like your...

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Venezuelan Opposition Leader Guaidó Declares Himself President, With U.S. Backing

Updated at 5:15 p.m. ET Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaidó declared himself the country's interim president amid nationwide protests Wednesday, in a bid to seize power from sitting leader Nicolás Maduro. The U.S. swiftly proclaimed its support for Guaidó. Maduro responded by announcing a break in diplomatic relations with Washington. Guaidó, the 35-year-old recently elected head of Venezuela's National Assembly, took the oath of office on an outdoor podium in Caracas, flanked by yellow,...

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Concern About Global Warming Among Americans Spikes, Report Says

In 2018, Americans watched as California towns were incinerated by fires, hurricanes devastated coastal communities and a government report sounded the alarm about the impacts of a changing climate. All those factors contributed to significant changes in perceptions of global warming in the U.S., according to the authors of a new public opinion survey. The proportion of Americans who said global warming is "personally important" to them jumped from 63 percent to 72 percent from March to...

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Politics From NPR

Pulitzer Prize-Winning Columnist Russell Baker Dies At 93

Russell Baker, the Pulitzer Prize winning writer who penned thousands of columns for The New York Times , and hosted the PBS television program "Masterpiece Theatre," died Monday at his home in Leesburg, Va. He was 93. Baker got his start as a news reporter with the Baltimore Sun , but became known for his "Observer" column in the Times , where he commented on modern life with unmistakable whimsy. Though often pegged to the specifics of the time, many of his observations are just as relevant...

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Science, Technology, And Medicine From NPR

From Cover-Ups To Secret Plots: The Murky History Of Supreme Justices' Health

For the first time in her 25-year career on the Supreme Court, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg was not on the bench to start the new year. After the 85-year-old justice was operated on for lung cancer, she decided to work from home rather than return to the court two weeks after surgery. She's expected to make a full recovery and be back at the court soon. A fair amount is known about Ginsburg's cancers and surgery, but the history of Supreme Court justices and their health is murkier. That's, in...

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Education From NPR

School Shocks Students With Disabilities. The FDA Is Moving To Ban The Practice

Luigi Disisto is a 47-year-old man who has autism and lives at a private special education center based in suburban Boston best known for being the only school in the country that shocks its students with disabilities to control their behavior. Disisto wears a backpack equipped with a battery and wires that are attached to his body to deliver a two-second shock if he misbehaves. The controversial practice at the Judge Rotenberg Educational Center has pitted family members, who swear it has...

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Arts, Culture, And Media From NPR

Beyond 'Shallow': A Look At The Oscars Picks For Best Original Song

There was some surprises in this year's 2019 Oscar nominations, but for people paying attention to the best original song category, Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper's "Shallow" from A Star Is Born was absolutely sure to make the cut. Aside from Gaga, other songs in this year's category include: "All The Stars," from Black Panther by Kendrick Lamar and SZA, "The Place Where Lost Things Go" from Mary Poppins Returns by Emily Blunt, "When a Cowboy Trades His Spurs for Wings" from The Ballad of...

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For Many With Disabilities, 'Let It Go' Is An Anthem Of Acceptance

This story is part of American Anthem, a yearlong series on songs that rouse, unite, celebrate and call to action. Find more at NPR.org/Anthem . Disney's Frozen remains one of the greatest box-office successes in history. But in terms of impact and influence, it is perhaps most loved and best remembered for one of its breakout songs. No matter which version you know best — the Oscar-winning film version sung by Idina Menzel, the pop version by Demi Lovato or the one currently performed on...

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Food, Nutrition, and Cuisine From NPR

You Don't Have To Go No-Carb: Instead, Think Slow Carb

If you like this article, you should check out Life Kit , NPR's new family of podcasts for navigating your life — everything from finances to diet and exercise to raising kids. Sign up for the newsletter to learn more and follow @NPRLifeKit on Twitter. Email us at lifekit@npr.org . Follow NPR's Allison Aubrey at @AubreyNPRFood . It's trendy to go low-carb these days, even no carb. And, yes, this can lead to quick weight loss. But ditching carbs is tough to do over the long haul. For starters,...

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don't miss:

Should Young Americans Be Required To Do Public Service? Federal Panel Says Maybe

Should the U.S. require its citizens to perform public service? Should its young women register for the draft? A federal panel says it is working on answers to those questions — and is considering how the nation could implement a universal service program and whether it should be mandatory or optional. "In a country of more than 329 million people, the extraordinary potential for service is largely untapped," said Joe Heck, chairman of the National Commission on Military, National, and Public...

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Jesse Rosales, Jr. for KVCR

Is That An Elephant On The Hill Above The 60 Fwy? No, It's An Ancient Mammoth... And A Fun Discovery

If you live in the Inland Empire and are driving on the 60 Freeway from Riverside towards Los Angeles, you might have seen the HUGE steel "elephant"-like statue looming in the distance on the hill above the freeway. Many people don't know it's acutally a sculpture of an ancient mammoth. Lots of drivers have wondered what it is, how it got there, and why it sits on that Jurupa Valley hill. As part of our listener-interactive reporting project, The Inland, KVCR's Shareen Awad went on a mission...

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