Says You Live Performance

On Saturday, January 25, KVCR will present an afternoon with Says You!…public radio’s quintessential quiz show, aired weekly from coast to coast.

California Rejects State's Largest Utility's Bankruptcy Plan

California Gov. Gavin Newsom rejected a bankruptcy restructuring plan by the state's largest utility, saying it "falls woefully short" of safety standards mandated under state law. The governor's criticisms come a week after Pacific Gas and Electric announced a multi-billion-dollar settlement proposal to pay victims of several wildfires linked to the utility's faulty equipment. Newsom's move complicates PG&E's efforts to both maintain control of its operations and move quickly through...

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Considering recent mass shootings in Pensacola, Santa Clarita, and other places, more and more people are saying it’s not a matter of if the next mass shooting will happen, but when. With this in mind, two Army Corps nurses at Loma Linda University Medical Center Murrieta have created new resources for dealing with mass casualty events. 

John Meyer and John “Lucky” Copeland both served in the Army before becoming nurses in the civilian world.

They currently work at Loma Linda University Medical Center Murrieta, which opened in 2011.

Longtime Inland Empire journalist and KVCR contributor Cassie MacDuff and KVCR's Benjamin Purper review some of the big Inland Empire news stories from the past week, including:

Monday through Thursday at lunchtime, Empire KVCR News has your daily news rundown. Stories highlighted today include:

Monday through Thursday at lunchtime, Empire KVCR News has your daily news rundown. Stories highlighted today include:

  1. Climate change could put California roads, bridges, and highways in jeopardy.
  2. Steep fines are being issued against property owners to stop illegal cannabis cultivation.
  3. CAL FIRE makes substantial progress on fire prevention projects.
  4. The Feed Your Radio, Feed a Family Campaign is happening now, where every dollar you contribute is a meal for someone in need. 

Updated at 10:50 p.m. ET

House Democrats began work on completing their articles of impeachment against President Trump Wednesday evening, setting the stage for a vote by the full House.

The Judiciary Committee convened to amend the impeachment legislation introduced Tuesday by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., with its chairman, Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y., calling the facts against Trump "overwhelming" and that Congress must act now to protect the integrity of U.S. election and its national security.

Monday through Thursday at lunchtime, Empire KVCR News has your daily news rundown. Stories highlighted today include:

  1. Rep. Pete Aguilar announces $720,000 to establish new tribal health program for the Inland Empire.
  2. Environmental groups call on CARB to strengthen advanced clean truck rule.
  3. California is instating a health insurance requirement next year.
  4. MOVE Dance Centers of Riverside is hosting a Christmas party and dance show.

Monday through Thursday at lunchtime, Empire KVCR News has your daily news rundown. Today’s highlighted story:

City leaders in Los Angeles are taking inspiration from Chicago in an effort prevent people from losing their homes.

 

 

 

 

John Lloyd / Flickr

With holiday shopping season now in full force, it’s prime time for diesel trucks. But with all those trucks can come a lot of pollution – and some environmental groups are calling for more of those trucks to be zero-emission. 

The California Air Resources Board, or CARB, is preparing to adopt the nation’s first electric truck manufacturing standard, called the Advanced Clean Truck rule.

It requires about four percent of trucks on the road to be zero-emission by 2030.

Longtime Inland Empire journalist and KVCR contributor Cassie MacDuff and KVCR's Benjamin Purper review some of the big Inland Empire news stories from the past week, including:

Monday through Thursday at lunchtime, Empire KVCR News has your daily news rundown. Today’s highlighted story:

The University of California moves towards a system of open access research, causing disruption in the industry.

 

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The Midday News Report

Empire KVCR News has your daily news rundown Monday through Thursday at lunchtime.

Just In From NPR:

For millions of Americans, time is running out to sign up for health insurance through the Affordable Care Act's online marketplace healthcare.gov.

For those who will not receive health coverage beginning Jan. 1, 2020 through an employer or other programs like Medicaid, Medicare or the Children's Health Insurance Program — commonly referred to as CHIP — the deadline to purchase health insurance is Sunday, Dec. 15.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And now we're joined by Congressman Dan Kildee, Democrat from Michigan. He is the chief deputy whip for the Democrats.

Congressman Kildee, welcome back to the program. Thanks for joining us once again.

DAN KILDEE: Thanks for having me on.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And now we're joined by Congressman Dan Kildee, Democrat from Michigan. He is the chief deputy whip for the Democrats.

Congressman Kildee, welcome back to the program. Thanks for joining us once again.

DAN KILDEE: Thanks for having me on.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And now we're joined by Congressman Dan Kildee, Democrat from Michigan. He is the chief deputy whip for the Democrats.

Congressman Kildee, welcome back to the program. Thanks for joining us once again.

DAN KILDEE: Thanks for having me on.

On Verge Of Impeachment Vote, First-Term, Moderate Democrats Weigh A Political Risk

Last month, Democratic freshman Rep. Elaine Luria of Virginia took a giant, political risk. The veteran Navy commander released a dramatic, 2-minute video declaring her support for the formal House impeachment inquiry. The move expanded the Republican target on her back, as the GOP vies to take back the seat she flipped to Democrats last year. Now, she has taken another risk, confirming she will vote yes to impeach President Trump next week. "I have always said this was not a political...

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American Samoans' Citizenship Status Still In Limbo After Judge Issues Stay

John Fitisemanu woke up early Friday morning, got dressed and finally completed one of the tasks on a more than 20-year-old to-do list: He registered to vote. For less than a day, Fitisemanu, who was born in American Samoa, was legally considered a full-fledged American citizen with voting rights and the ability to run for office or hold certain government jobs. But a judge in a Utah federal court has once again thrown his much longed-for status into question. After ruling on Thursday that...

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Opinion: Should It Be Illegal To Sleep Outside?

A woman lived in her car in front of our apartment building for a couple of weeks. Our family brought down some food, clothing and a blanket, but the woman hesitated to open her door when we knocked and smiled. After all, who were we? Why should she trust us? We did not call police or a city agency to say, "There's a woman living in a car on our street." I've reported stories where I've spent the night in city homeless shelters. They can feel crowded and unsafe, and have little privacy. I can...

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Life Along Pakistan's Mountain Highway Where China Is Investing Billions Of Dollars

Much is expected of Karakoram Highway, which curls through the tall mountain ranges of northern Pakistan, reaching western China. Both countries are renovating it, seeing its potential as a trade route. Pakistan also views it as a way to consolidate control over territories contested with India. But some of the 500-mile route is barely a two-way road, carved out of the rock face that slopes sharply into valleys below. It is battered by rockfall, floods and earthquakes. A landslide in 2010...

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Fresh Air Weekend: The Afterlife Of Donated Stuff; 'Maisel' Actor Alex Borstein

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week: 'The Best Thing You Can Do Is Not Buy More Stuff,' Says 'Secondhand' Expert: "Your average thrift store in the United States only sells about one-third of the stuff that ends up on its shelves," Adam...

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They're The Bravest, Humblest Civil Servants In Pakistan

Tracking down killers. Standing up to corruption. Fighting for the little guy. It's all just part of the job for the five civil servants from across Pakistan who were honored Monday night in Islamabad at Integrity Icon 2019. The goal of the award ceremony is to "'name and fame' instead of 'name and shame,'" shining examples of government workers, explains Fayyaz Yaseen of Accountability Lab , a nonprofit group that promotes transparency and accountability. "When people talk about corruption,...

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Arts, Culture, And Media From NPR

Kids These Days ... Are Reading Nietzsche In The 'Burbs'

It's about time that disaffected teenagers get the credit they've long deserved and never wanted. Sure, they can be kind of frustrating, with their hair-trigger eye-rolling reflex and grunted monosyllabic responses to any possible question, but they're also likely single-handedly keeping the French-poetry-collection and black-coffee industries alive. (And if there's a thriving black market for now-banned clove cigarettes — a staple of depressed and pretentious teens back when I was one of...

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Science, Technology, And Medicine From NPR

Holiday Parties Make You Squirm? Here's How To Conquer Social Anxiety

"If I say the word 'circus,' it means I'm ready to leave the party." That's what Angie Ebba, 39, of Portland, Ore., tells close friends when she's at a holiday soiree. It might sound strange, but coming up with a code word is one way Ebba tames her social anxiety. "If I need to leave, having a word I can slip into conversation is a discreet way to let my friends know," Ebba explains. Most of us feel socially uncomfortable from time to time, but for Ebba, the anxiety of attending a party...

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don't miss:

Tensions Over Politics At Work? Tell Us About It

As the 2020 presidential season gears up, it's harder to engage in neutral political discussions at the water cooler. Identity politics is tougher to avoid, especially as more CEOs and workers take stands on issues. Are you a conservative awash in a liberal-leaning workplace? A lone liberal in a right-leaning company? Does this affect how you work in teams? Do you feel discriminated against, silenced or judged for your beliefs? Maybe political differences have caused some heated conversations...

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