News

Monday through Thursday at lunchtime, Empire KVCR News has your daily news rundown. Stories highlighted today include:

  1. An investigative series reveals more than 80 law enforcement officers in California are convicted criminals.
  2. A legal group files federal lawsuit to overturn California’s requirement to place women on boards of directors.
  3. An investigation finds that the leak of July’s state bar exam questions was caused by human error.
  4. The goldspotted oak borer beetle found in Wrightwood trees.

Monday through Thursday at lunchtime, Empire KVCR News has your daily news rundown. Stories highlighted today include:

A new investigative series by a collaboration of California news outlets has revealed that more than 80 law enforcement officers working in the Golden State today are convicted criminals.

Robert Lewis is one of the reporters who worked on the series. He says that California is one of only five states in the country that doesn’t decertify officers for misconduct.

Loma Linda Psychologist On The Epidemic Of Teen Suicide

Nov 12, 2019

A report released in October by the CDC shows that teen suicide rates in the United States have skyrocketed in the past decade, becoming the second-leading cause of death for older teens and young adults.

Dr. Jennifer Weniger is a licensed psychologist and the director of clinical training at Loma Linda University Behavioral Medicine Center.

She says the uptick in teen suicide rates in the past decade is due to several different factors.

Monday through Thursday at lunchtime, Empire KVCR News has your daily news rundown. Today’s highlighted story:

A Loma Linda psychologist discusses different factors for the rise of teen suicide in the US.

 

For the fourth year in a row, Vietnam vets in Redlands are inviting veterans and their families to their city for dinner. KVCR's Rick Dulock has more.

Friday News Wrap With Cassie MacDuff: Election Results

Nov 8, 2019

Longtime Inland Empire journalist and KVCR contributor, Cassie MacDuff and KVCR's Rick Dulock review some of the big Inland Empire news stories from the past week, including:

Monday through Thursday at lunchtime, Empire KVCR News has your daily news rundown. Today’s highlighted story:

A system of community lending used by many immigrant groups has become a tool to boost credit scores.

 

Monday through Thursday at lunchtime, Empire KVCR News has your daily news rundown. Today’s highlighted story:

Riverside County is the only county in California that issues permits for home kitchen businesses and the program is poised to expand.

 

Monday through Thursday at lunchtime, Empire KVCR News has your daily news rundown. Stories highlighted today include:

Monday through Thursday at lunchtime, Empire KVCR News has your daily news rundown. Stories highlighted today include: 

1. A bill to change daylight saving time could be on the ballot for next year. 

2. Strong winds and destructive wildfires become a common weather pattern for California. 

3. The Inland Empire has the second highest concentration of physically demanding jobs in the US. 

4. California’s Assembly Speaker has the same name as a world champion baseball player, causing some trouble for him. 

Monday through Thursday at lunchtime, Empire KVCR News has your daily news rundown. Stories highlighted today include:

10/29 Empire KVCR Midday News: Employee Ownership

Oct 29, 2019

Monday through Thursday at lunchtime, Empire KVCR News has your daily news rundown. Today’s highlighted story:

Some business owners have found a way to push back on their lack of personal wealth by selling their companies to their workers.

 

Monday through Thursday at lunchtime, Empire KVCR News has your daily news rundown. Stories highlighted today include:

  1. Three men and a woman arrested for allegedly stealing plants from hemp farm.
  2. Many independently-owned pharmacies in California might close doors to low income patients following state cuts.
  3. California’s November 2020 ballot could include another rent control measure.
  4. Fire weather watch in effect for mountains, valleys, and passes in the Inland Empire.

According to a report from the San Bernardino Sun Newspaper, by Friday evening, containment on the Old Water fire in San Bernardino grew to 85% .

San Bernardino County fire officials said the blaze had scorched 145 acres along Highway 18 in Waterman Canyon. Fire spokesman Eric Sherwin said Friday that the department had no information to announce on how and where the fire started as the investigation continues.

Longtime Inland Empire journalist and KVCR contributor, Cassie MacDuff and KVCR's Rick Dulock review some of the big Inland Empire news stories from the past week, including:

1. Riverside County supervisors say a proposed “good neighbor” warehouse ordinance isn’t strong enough.
2. San Bernardino City Unified School District computers were shut down by a ransomware attack.
3. The Diocese of San Bernardino has come up with a plan to compensate victims of clergy sexual abuse.

Mandatory evacuations were ordered Thursday morning for a portion of north San Bernardino after a wind-driven brush fire was reported. The fire, dubbed the Old Water Fire, began just after 2 a.m. near Old Waterman Canyon Road and Highway 18.  
The blaze quickly burned about 75 acres and a flare-up this afternoon was sending smoke down the mountain and into the city.
The Forest Service is working with the San Bernardino County Fire Department, Cal Fire and local agencies in battling the Old Water Fire.  400 personnel,  air tankers and helicopters have kept the blaze at bay.

Monday through Thursday at lunchtime, Empire KVCR News has your daily news rundown. Today’s highlighted story:

A Loma Linda psychiatrist speaks about the growing dangers and rise of the drug Fentanyl.

 

Monday through Thursday at lunchtime, Empire KVCR News has your daily news rundown. Stories highlighted today include:

  1. Strong Santa Ana winds will blow through the region Thursday and Friday.
  2. Upgraded energy management system should help blackouts during future heat waves.
  3. California State University Chancellor Timothy White announces retirement.
  4. Trump administration’s new plan to govern California water usage alarms environmental groups.

Deaths from the drug fentanyl have spiked over the last few years. KVCR’s Benjamin Purper speaks with a Loma Linda psychiatrist about the growing trend of fentanyl deaths and what can be done to address it.

Dr. David Puder is a psychiatrist at Loma Linda University Health. He says fentanyl is an opiate, like heroin.

Monday through Thursday at lunchtime, Empire KVCR News has your daily news rundown. Stories highlighted today include:

1) San Bernardino City Unified School District has been hit with a ransomware attack.

2) Riverside County's unemployment rate falls below four percent.

3) WalletHub releases its list of best colleges and universities in California, and three Inland Empire schools made the cut.

Benjamin Purper / KVCR

Residents from two San Bernardino neighborhood associations gathered yesterday to protest a proposed Transitional Assistance Department building near their neighborhood.

The protest was held by residents of two different neighborhood associations – Blair Park and Muscupiabe.

The demonstrators were protesting a proposed welfare office across the street from a residential development, on the corner of 27th Street and Little Mountain Drive in San Bernardino.

Longtime Inland Empire journalist and KVCR contributor, Cassie MacDuff and KVCR's Benjamin Purper review some of the big Inland Empire news stories from the past week, including:

10/17 Empire KVCR Midday News: Blackout Aftermath

Oct 17, 2019

Monday through Thursday at lunchtime, Empire KVCR News has your daily news rundown. Today’s highlighted story:

  1. The California Public Utility Commission has called an emergency hearing to question PG&E company leaders about the recent power outage.

Find Your Pumpkin - Have Some Fun!

Oct 16, 2019
flickr.com

There are many places to get your pumpkin and have fun in the Inland Empire. At the Pumpkin Factory in Corona, or at the Hunters Pumpkin Patch in Moreno Valley, for example, you can enjoy games, music, snacks, petting zoos, pig races, pony rides, and more. Pumpkin patches are typically open throughout the entire month of October. However, if you're in Skyforest, try the Pumpkins in the Pines Festival, October 26 and 27. For details on locations and more click this link.

Monday through Thursday at lunchtime, Empire KVCR News has your daily news rundown. Stories highlighted today include:

Morongo Casino Resort & Spa

Morongo Casino Resort & Spa is expanding its gaming floor and creating over 400 jobs.

The 65,000-square-foot expansion will add 800 slot machines, a new bar and lounge areas, and a dedicated nonsmoking space to the casino floor.

The Morongo Band of Mission Indians say the expansion will create 425 new full-time jobs, adding to the 2,500 jobs already provided by the casino.

Simon Farmer is the Executive Director of Marketing for the casino. He says the expansion will add to the $3 billion in regional economic activity that the casino already generates.

Monday through Thursday at lunchtime, Empire KVCR News has your daily news rundown. Stories highlighted today include:

  1. New Temescal Valley medical facility addresses regional doctor shortages.
  2. Governor Gavin Newsom signs several bills that seek to move California closer to universal health care.
  3. Calimesa Blaze that killed two people and destroyed 1,011 acres reaches full containment.
  4. Two educators from Riverside County received the Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching.  

Don Miller

If you happened to see this beautiful train (pictured) steaming its way through the Inland Empire, you witnessed the nationwide tour of Union Pacific's #4014 Big Boy Excursion Train. Train enthusiasts would have the schedule from this link. Thanks to Don Miller for the picture and information!

Benjamin Purper / KVCR

The Center for Biological Diversity petitioned the California Fish and Game Commission today to protect western Joshua trees under the California Endangered Species Act.

Joshua trees, which are native to the Mojave Desert, are threatened by climate change and habitat destruction.

Brendan Cummings is the Center for Biological Diversity’s conservation director and a Joshua tree resident.

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