Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman is a reporter and editor, working mainly on breaking news for NPR's digital and radio platforms.

He brings to NPR years of experience as a journalist at a variety of news organizations based all over the world. He came to NPR from The Associated Press in Bangkok, Thailand, where he worked as an editor on the news agency's Asia Desk. Prior to that, Neuman worked in Hong Kong with The Wall Street Journal, where among other things he reported extensively from Pakistan in the wake of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. He also spent time with the AP in New York, and in India as a bureau chief for United Press International.

A native Hoosier, Neuman's roots in public radio (and the Midwest) run deep. He started his career at member station WBNI in Fort Wayne, and worked later in Illinois for WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford and WILL in Champaign-Urbana.

Neuman is a graduate of Purdue University. He lives with his wife, Noi, on the Chesapeake Bay in Maryland.

Updated at 4:35 p.m. ET

Police in San Bernardino County today announced their arrest of a suspect in the murder of Joseph McStay, his wife and two young sons, whose bodies were found in shallow graves in the California desert in 2013, four years after their mysterious disappearance.

Charles "Chase" Merritt, 57, described by authorities as a business associate of the family, was arrested on Oct. 5 in Victorville, Calif., about 85 miles north of the U.S.-Mexico border where the bodies were found on Nov. 11, 2013, police said.

Updated at 1:15 p.m. ET

A federal judge today gave the OK to a bankruptcy exit strategy proposed by Detroit nearly 16 months after the city asked for protection from its creditors.

At a 1 p.m. ET hearing, Judge Steven Rhodes found that the plan was fair and feasible. He's expected to issue a written ruling later.

"This city is insolvent and desperately needs to fix its future," Rhodes said.

Updated at 4:25 p.m. ET

A federal judge in Missouri has ruled that the state's ban on same-sex marriage violates the equal protection clause of the U.S. Constitution, adding to an already confusing mix of contradictory decisions that is sure to propel the issue to the Supreme Court.

Beijing and Tokyo have jointly acknowledged their competing claims over the sovereignty of an uninhabited island chain, effectively setting aside a contentious dispute and paving the way to renew high-level contacts two years after China unilaterally froze relations.

Astronomers have long theorized that planetary systems, including our own, are formed by spinning discs of dust and gas that slowly coalesce. Now, by combining input from an array of radio telescopes located in the Chilean desert, they have sharp images showing what they believe to be just such planet formation.

House Speaker John Boehner said approval of the controversial Keystone XL oil pipeline and the repeal of key parts of Obamacare are among Republicans' top priorities now that the GOP has won control of both houses of Congress.

"Obamacare is hurting our economy, it's hurting middle-class workers, and it's hurting the ability to create more jobs," Boehner said, adding that Republicans want to replace it with "common-sense reforms."

1st Lt. Alonzo H. Cushing, whose defense of a key ridge at the Battle of Gettysburg helped turn the tide of the Civil War and end slavery, was today posthumously awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor by the country's first black president.

At the ceremony, President Obama said the award highlights the obligation the nation has to the military men and women who serve it.

"No matter how long it takes, it's never too late to do the right thing," the president said.

"This story is part of our larger American story and one that continues to this very day," he said.

Move over, Shark Week: In the latest anything-for-ratings move, Discovery Channel plans to air a show called Eaten Alive that it says features a man in a special protective suit being swallowed whole by a giant anaconda.

Tom Magliozzi, one half of the wisecracking Car Talk duo known as "Click and Clack the Tappet Brothers," has died from complications of Alzheimer's disease. He was 77.

Car Talk Executive Producer Doug Berman sent this note Monday:

"I have the sad duty to report today that Tom Magliozzi, one of the hosts of Car Talk, passed away this morning due to complications of Alzheimer's Disease.

This hasn't been the best of days for the Washington Redskins.

First, one of the team buses crashed en route to Minnesota, where the Redskins were to play the Vikings.

ESPN says:

A new United Nations report is warning that fossil fuels must be entirely phased out by the end of the century in order to avoid dangerous and irreversible damage to the Earth's climate.

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) says the world faces "severe, pervasive and irreversible" consequences if greenhouse gas emissions are not cut to zero by 2100.

Examples of "irreversible" change include a runaway melt of the Greenland ice cap that would trigger devastating sea-level rise and could swamp coastal cities and disrupt agriculturally critical monsoons.

Two Kenyans have taken the men's and women's titles at the New York City Marathon: Wilson Kipsang with an unofficial time of 2 hours, 10 minutes, 59 seconds, and Mary Keitany finishing 2 hours, 25 minutes, 7 seconds after the start.

Kipsang, a former world-record holder, has now won in Berlin, London and New York within a 13-month span, The Associated Press says.

Updated at 3 p.m. ET

The breakaway regions of Donetsk and Luhansk in eastern Ukraine have defied Kiev by holding elections today aimed at legitimizing their self-declared republics. They say exit polls show militia leader Alexander Zakharchenko winning 80 percent of the vote for prime minister of the self-proclaimed Donetsk People's Republic.

Zakharchenko, a 38-year-old former electrician, declared himself premier of the region back in August.

Updated at 12:50 p.m. ET

A suspected suicide bomb attack on the Pakistani side of a tense border post with India has killed at least 45 people and wounded another 100, a senior official says.

"According to initial information it was a suicide attack," Inspector General of Punjab Police, Mushtaq Sukhera, told local television channels, according to Reuters.

"When ... security was a bit relaxed, the suicide attacker blew himself up near a restaurant," Sukhera said, who said many more were wounded.

Electricity has been restored in Bangladesh a day after the impoverished South Asian country was thrust into darkness by a nationwide outage.

The country's energy grid was fully restored, and any further problems that may arise would be for "local reasons," Junior Power Minister Nasrul Hamid told reporters, according to The Associated Press.

Michael Alsbury, the co-pilot killed during a test flight of Virgin Galactic's SpaceShipTwo is being described as an expert pilot and engineer who had 15 years of flying experience, much of it on experimental aircraft.

Alsbury, 39, was killed Friday when the prototype of the reusable space plane, designed for suborbital tourist flights, apparently broke apart in midair over the Mojave Desert. Pilot Peter Siebold, 43, survived and is described as alert and talking.

Updated at 12:55 p.m. ET

A judge in Maine has turned down a request by state officials seeking authority to compel nurse Kaci Hickox to remain in her home for the duration of a 21-day incubation for Ebola. Since returning from West Africa, where she treated Ebola patients, Hickox has refused to accept a voluntary quarantine.

Updated at 10:40 a.m. ET

Burkina Faso's military appears to have taken control of the African nation shortly after longtime President Blaise Compaore, who had ruled since staging a coup in 1987, agreed to resign as part of what he said was a plan to hold elections in 90 days.

NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton reports that the country's armed forces chief, Gen. Honore Traore, announced on Friday that he was taking charge, but it wasn't clear whether his role would be as interim leader or something more permanent.

Officials in Hawaii are sending National Guard troops to the town of Pahoa on the Big Island, where a lava flow is creeping toward a main road, threatening to cut off the community.

Hawaii County Civil Defense Director Darryl Oliveira said 83 troops have been sent to the town of fewer than 1,000 to help provide security. They are to aid in a road block and with other safety issues, The Associated Press says.

"These are local troops, people from the community. They'll be here working to take care of their family and friends," Oliveira said.

Updated at 10:05 a.m. ET

Eric Frein, the man who allegedly shot and killed a police officer and wounded another before leading authorities on a massive 48-day manhunt through rural Pennsylvania, appeared in court today appearing thin and bruised from his weeks on the run.

Boston's longest-serving mayor, Thomas Michael Menino, who held the job for more than two decades until stepping aside earlier this year, has died. He was 71.

The U.S. economy grew at the solid pace of 3.5 percent for the third quarter, helped along by gains in business investment, exports and a big jump in military spending, the Commerce Department says.

Updated at 1:40 p.m. ET

Hours after Kaci Hickox defiantly breached a voluntary quarantine for possible Ebola by going on a bike ride, Gov. Paul LePage threatened to use "the full extent" of his authority to compel the nurse to remain in isolation.

"I was ready and willing — and remain ready and willing — to reasonably address the needs of healthcare workers meeting guidelines to assure the public health is protected," LePage said in a statement.

Tim Cook, the head of the world's most iconic technology company, has come out today in an op-ed on Bloomberg Businessweek, saying he's never denied his sexual orientation but "I haven't publicly acknowledged it either, until now.

"Being gay has given me a deeper understanding of what it means to be in the minority and provided a window into the challenges that people in other minority groups deal with every day," Cook writes.

Thousands of protesters in Burkina Faso broke through police lines and surged into the country's parliament, setting the building on fire ahead of a vote that would have allowed the country's president to extend his 27-year rule of the West African country.

The BBC reports that the ruling party headquarters and the city hall in the capital, Ouagadougou, were also in flames. State television reportedly went off the air.

Tunisia's main secularist party has won a decisive victory against Islamists in parliamentary elections, grabbing 85 seats, or just under 40 percent in the 217-seat assembly, according to official results.

The Nidda Tounes (Tunisia Calls) party bested the ruling Islamist Ennahda party, which secured just 69 seats. Ennahda swept to power in the first such elections after the 2011 'Arab Spring' uprising in the North African country.

NPR's Geoff Brumfiel reports that as investigators examine what went wrong with the launch of an unmanned Antares rocket on Tuesday, they'll likely take a hard look at powerful engines originally destined to send cosmonauts to the moon, a project that was scrapped by the USSR more than four decades ago.

Maine's Gov. Paul LePage says he will seek to legally force a nurse to undergo a 21-day quarantine after her return from West Africa, where she volunteered to treat Ebola patients.

The White House says it has taken steps to address "suspicious activity" detected on the unclassified Executive Office of the President computer network in recent weeks — a breach that The Washington Post says may be the work of hackers hired by the Kremlin.

At least 10 North Korean officials have reportedly been put to death recently for the crime of watching South Korean soap operas.

The latest public executions reportedly bring to at least 50 the number of people put to death by the hard-line regime for taking in the unauthorized day-time dramas from south of the DMZ, The Independent reports, quoting South Korean sources familiar with a National Intelligence Service (NIS) briefing.

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