Inland Empire marijuana

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   INDIO (CNS) - Marijuana consumers, cultivators, state and local officials will congregate in the Coachella Valley today and tomorrow (Monday and Tuesday) for the 2019 SoCal Cannabis Summit, highlighting commercial opportunities in the region, as well as clarifying some of the hazier aspects of the regulatory schemes affecting growers and sellers throughout Riverside County and the state.

en.wikipedia.org

The state of California is scaling back its expectations for marijuana revenue over the next year, thanks to many local communities around the state that are still refusing to allow cannabis sales within their jurisdictions.  More from KVCR's Ken Vincent.

RivCo Supervisors Establish Provisional Steps For Licensing Cannabis Businesses

Jan 30, 2019
highroadcg.com

   RIVERSIDE (CNS) - Overcoming reservations, Riverside County
supervisors yesterday (Tuesday) tentatively adopted specific processes by which marijuana
growers and sellers can obtain permits to do business in unincorporated
communities, though components of the regulatory framework still need to be
refined.
   ``We've been at this a long time,'' Board of Supervisors Chairman
Kevin Jeffries said before the 4-1 vote. ``We clearly have work to do, because
there are a number of concerns. It's not the Christmas tree that everybody
wanted.''

420intel.com

Tuesday's election results show Inland Empire voters favoring several measures regulating and taxing marijuana.  KVCR's Benjamin Purper reports.

Riverside County

After an hours-long public hearing, the Riverside County Board of Supervisors narrowly approved a plan to allow the sale and cultivation of marijuana in unincorporated areas of the county.  More from KVCR's Ken Vincent.

marijuanaandbusiness.com

The Riverside County Board of Supervisors will vote Tuesday on whether to license and regulate commercial marijuana businesses in the county's unincorporated areas.  KVCR's Ken Vincent has more.

screenshot from KABC Los Angeles

Faith and marijuana in Jurupa Valley is the subject of our next story.  The Vault Church of Open Faith is unique among Inland Empire churches - it's also a marijuana dispensary.  Or, it was, until the city of Jurupa Valley shut it down.  KVCR's Benjamin Purper attended services, and has this story.

MERCY: “Alright. Thank you guys for all coming today. My name’s Mercy…”

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After first resisting, and then engaging in some bureaucratic foot-dragging, the City of San Bernardino will follow the mandate of city voters and finally begin to process applications for commercial cannabis businesses to operate in San Bernardino.  KVCR's Benjamin Purper has more.

wikileaf.com

Moreno Valley has joined the list of Inland Empire cities being sued for its regulations on legal marijuana.  KVCR's Benjamin Purper has the story.

activistpost.com

In the Inland Empire and around the state of California, some local elected officials remain resistant to making legal marijuana available in their communities.  Other public officials are showing signs that their anti-cannabis viewes are "evolving," or at least catching up with the views of a majority of their constituents.  KVCR's Ken Vincent and Capital Public Radio's Ezra David Romero have more in this report.

dopedirectory.com

The San Bernardino City Council continues to defy the will of the city's voters by once again extending a moratorium on the legal sale of recreational and medicinal marijuana within the city.  KVCR's Benjamin Purper has more.

cannabisreports.org

New Year's Day marked a seismic shift for California's culture, economy, and law enforcement.  It is now legal for adults 21 and over to walk into a licensed retailer and buy cannabis for recreational use.  Voters set this change in motion when the approved Proposition 64 in November of 2016.  However as Capital Public Radio's Julia Mitric reports, the rollout of commercial marijuana sales is moving slowly.

Ben Thomsen/vice.com

People in the Inland Empire who wanted to take advantage of California's new law legalizing recreational marijuana had to search for the few, sometimes far-flung outlets in our region that were open and selling product to the public.  More from KVCR's Ken Vincent.