KQED

Here's What California's Wildflower 'Super Bloom' Looks Like From Space

It's a fantastic year for wildflower lovers, who've been flocking to fields of poppies, lupine and golden brush. The orange, purple and yellow blooms are already populating the warmer climes of Southern California and the Central Valley thanks to above average winter rainfall following five years of drought. Here in the Inland Empire, crowds of people and their vehicles have been clogging roads and trails in the Lake Elsinore area to get a view of fields of California poppies covering local...

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Whatever Happened To Riverside's - And Other Inland Communities' - Chinatowns? Here's The Story.

Chinese workers came to Riverside after the construction of the Transcontinental Railroad, having a large impact on the local citrus industry. But many people may not realize that what developed from that was not one, but two Chinatowns in Riverside, in additon to Chinatowns in other inland communities. What was that early Chinese experience like, and what exactly happened to those Chinatowns? KVCR's Shareen Awad has the story. Judy Lee is a supporter and Co-founder of the Save Our Chinatown...

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The Student Strike That Changed Higher Ed Forever

Today, ethnic studies is an accepted part of academia. Many if not most college students have taken a course or two. But 50 years ago, studying the history and culture of any people who were not white and Western was considered radical. Then came the longest student strike in U.S. history, at San Francisco State College, which changed everything. The groundwork was laid for the strike a couple of years before, when black students organized to press for a black studies department and the...

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Iconic Poet And Activist Lawrence Ferlinghetti Turns 100

Lawrence Ferlinghetti, the iconic poet and activist who helped to change the face of literary culture when he founded City Lights bookstore and publishing house in San Francisco in the 1950s, turns 100 years old on Sunday. And as Chloe Veltman ( @chloeveltman ) from member station KQED reports, hes marking the anniversary with new work. This article was originally published on WBUR.org. Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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Newly Uncovered Georgia O'Keeffe Letters Shed Light On Her Greatest Paintings

Imagine Georgia O'Keeffe needing "luck" to paint a flower. But there it is, in the artist's twirling calligraphy, in a letter to her friend, documentary filmmaker Henwar Rodakiewicz. Maybe I've been absurd about wanting to do a big flower painting, but I've wanted to do it and that is that. I'm going to try. Wish me luck. The letter is in a never-before-seen trove of O'Keeffe's correspondences newly acquired by the Library of Congress. In this particular 1936 letter, O'Keeffe writes about an ...

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Inland Empire Economist John Husing

Dec 17, 2013

John Husing, the Chief Economist for the Inland Empire Economic Partnership, talks with KVCR's Ken Vincent about how the Federal Reserve controls inflation.

Inland Empire Economist John Husing

Dec 17, 2013

John Husing, the Chief Economist for the Inland Empire Economic Partnership, talks with KVCR's Ken Vincent about how the Federal Reserve controls inflation.

Inland Empire Economist John Husing

Dec 17, 2013

John Husing, the Chief Economist for the Inland Empire Economic Partnership, talks with KVCR's Ken Vincent about how the Federal Reserve controls inflation.

"Addams Family" Comes to Riverside's Fox Theatre

Dec 11, 2013

KVCR's Ken Vincent talks with actor Blaire Anderson, one of the performers in the touring Broadway production of the stage musical, "The Addams Family," playing one night only, Thursday, Dec. 12, at the historic Fox Theatre in downtown Riverside.

David Fleming in conversation with Stray Cat Lee Rocker performing at the Historic Hemet Theatre. John Sheldon speaks to us about Through Wonderland at Crafton Hills. Also, Ron Berglass speaks with Paul Jacques about some seasonal theatre in the area. Ron also speaks with Alayna Via, director of the Citrus Valley High School performing arts department. 

San Manuel Philippines Donation

Nov 16, 2013

The San Manuel Band of Mission Indians has donated a total of one million dollars to help the people of the Philippines in the catastrophic aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan. The American Red Cross and International Medical Core will each receive $500,000 to assist with humanitarian aid efforts. KVCR's Jhoann Acosta has more.

A University of California, Riverside professor has written a new series of books for children -- suitable for the classroom -- that aims to redefine the image and role of The Princess in children's literature. KVCR Matt Guilhem reports.

Native American Art Event This Weekend

Nov 8, 2013

Members of the Inland Empire tribes will be joining Native American tribes from all over the U.S. at a big Native American art and culture event in Los Angeles this weekend. Terria Smith with KVCR's First Nations Experience (FNX) worldwide TV channel reports.

David Fleming speaks with Shaelyn Blaney about JAMS (journey across musical scenes). Matt Gillum looks at UC Riverside STEM research. Terria Smith speaks with Jolie Proudfoot about the Native American Film Festival. John Sheldon in conversation with Tom Bryant, Director of Theatre at Crafton Hills College.

Mixing culinary into arts and entertainment, Julian Miller speaking with Genie and Forest O'Neil, owners and operators of Festivity Ignition. David Fleming speaks with Murray Hepner about the Lewis Family Playhouse and the upcoming season for the Mainstreet Theatre Company. Lillian Vasquez tells us about numerous events in the area that KVCR is either presenting or sponsoring. Rick Dulock spoke with Diane Mitchell, the current artistic director for the Hemet Community Concert Association.

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Just In From NPR:

Traditionally, taking a company public involved a trade-off: on the one hand, selling shares in your company could mean bringing in a ton of money; on the other hand, you had to give up some of your power to shareholders. And then tech CEOs started using a trick to make sure they could raise money and keep a lot of the power for themselves: dual-class stock.

Music: "Morning Start".

As a teenager, former Congressman and now Democratic presidential hopeful Beto O’Rourke belonged to one of the best known hacking groups in the country: The Cult of the Dead Cow. Reports say he didn’t do much hacking, other than finding some ways around the phone bills he incurred with his dial-up modem. But what does the group do?

How do you feel when you're watching a detective story and the murder is definitively solved at the halfway point? Cheated ... or intrigued?

Imagine Georgia O'Keeffe needing "luck" to paint a flower. But there it is, in the artist's twirling calligraphy, in a letter to her friend, documentary filmmaker Henwar Rodakiewicz.

Maybe I've been absurd about wanting to do a big flower painting, but I've wanted to do it and that is that. I'm going to try. Wish me luck.

More From NPR

Texas National Guard Called In, Residents Told To Shelter In Place After Elevated Levels Of Benzene

Residents of Deer Park, Texas, were told to shelter in place Thursday morning after elevated levels of benzene were detected following a huge chemical storage facility fire this week. On Wednesday, state environmental officials said that benzene levels didnt pose a health concern. Houston Public Medias energy and environment reporter Travis Bubenik ( @travisbubenik ) joins Here & Now s Jeremy Hobson to review the latest news. This article was originally published on WBUR.org. Copyright 2019...

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Former Murdoch Executive Says He Quit Over Fox's Anti-Muslim Rhetoric

In recent days, Rupert Murdoch's Fox News Channel and some of its corporate siblings have faced renewed and withering criticism for the way they depict Muslims and immigrants. Calls for boycotts of shows and pressure campaigns on advertisers ensued. Last weekend, a Muslim news producer said she quit Fox's corporate cousin, Sky News Australia, over its coverage of Muslims following the massacre at two New Zealand mosques. Her post went viral. Now, add the voice of one of Murdoch's former...

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Nebraska Faces Over $1.3 Billion In Flood Losses

The "bomb cyclone" that swept through the Midwest this week has caused more than $1 billion of flood damage in Nebraska, the state's governor said Wednesday. At least three people have been killed in Nebraska and Iowa. Heavy rainfall and rapid snowmelt have caused catastrophic flooding across the Missouri River Basin, and three-fourths of Nebraska's 93 counties have declared an emergency, Gov. Pete Ricketts said. The cost of the damage has surpassed $1.3 billion, state officials said,...

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EU Fines Google $1.7 Billion Over 'Abusive' Online Ad Strategies

The European Commission is hitting Google with a fine of 1.49 billion euros (some $1.7 billion) for "abusive practices" in online advertising, saying the search and advertising giant broke the EU's antitrust rules and abused its market dominance by preventing or limiting its rivals from working with companies that had deals with Google. The case revolves around search boxes that are embedded on websites and that display ads brokered by Google. Those ads are powered by AdSense for Search — a...

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Lyft Going Public: The Dual-Class Share Dilemma

Traditionally, taking a company public involved a trade-off: on the one hand, selling shares in your company could mean bringing in a ton of money; on the other hand, you had to give up some of your power to shareholders. And then tech CEOs started using a trick to make sure they could raise money and keep a lot of the power for themselves: dual-class stock. Music: "Morning Start" . Find us: Twitter / Facebook .
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West and Pacific Rim

California Jury Finds Roundup Caused Man's Cancer

A San Francisco federal jury unanimously agreed on Tuesday that Roundup caused a man's cancer — a potentially massive blow to the company that produces the glyphosate-based herbicide currently facing hundreds of similar lawsuits. After five days of deliberation the jury concluded the weed killer was a " substantial factor " in causing non-Hodgkins lymphoma in Edwin Hardeman, a 70-year-old Sonoma County man. The verdict is the second in the U.S. to find a connection between the herbicide's key...

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Politics From NPR

Democratic Candidates Embrace The Risk Of Radical Ideas

Democratic presidential hopefuls are betting on bold. The majority of the Democrats running for president want to create a national health insurance program. Several want to do away with private health insurance entirely. Candidates are engaging on questions about reparations for slavery, and most of the White House hopefuls have endorsed the goal of a carbon-neutral economy within the next decade. Increase the size of the U.S. Supreme Court? Several candidates are now on board. Massachusetts...

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Science, Technology, And Medicine From NPR

Fentanyl-Linked Deaths: The U.S. Opioid Epidemic's Third Wave Begins

Men are dying after opioid overdoses at nearly three times the rate of women in the United States. Overdose deaths are increasing faster among black and Latino Americans than among whites. And there's an especially steep rise in the number of young adults ages 25 to 34 whose death certificates include some version of the drug fentanyl. These findings, published Thursday in a report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, highlight the start of the third wave of the nation's opioid...

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Education From NPR

Harvard Profits From Photos Of Slaves, Lawsuit Claims

The enslaved man's name was Renty. His image adorns the cover of a Harvard publication that the university sells for $40. Tamara Lanier says "Papa Renty" is the patriarch of her family. And in a lawsuit filed Wednesday, she says Harvard is using those photos without permission — and in so doing, profiting from photos taken by a racist professor determined to prove the inferiority of black people. Lanier says that Harvard has no rightful claim to the images of Renty or his daughter, Delia,...

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Arts, Culture, And Media From NPR

Can Woodstock 50 'Re-Create The Magic' Of The Original Festival?

It's been 50 years since Woodstock Music & Arts Festival. To celebrate the 50th anniversary of three days of peace, love and music, Woodstock 50 will take place Aug. 16–18, 2019, in Watkins Glen, N.Y. Festival co-founder Michael Lang has announced the official lineup for the anniversary festival with Jay-Z , Dead & Company and The Killers as headliners. Rounding out the list of performers are Miley Cyrus, Imagine Dragons, The Black Keys and Chance The Rapper as well as acts like Santana who...

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Food, Nutrition, and Cuisine From NPR

Why Restaurant Demand For Smaller Fish Fillets Is Bad News For Oceans

Bigger isn't necessarily better when it comes to catching, selling and eating fish. For certain snappers, in fact, a market preference for plate-size whole fillets is driving fishermen to target smaller fish. For some wild fish populations, this is a recipe for collapse. "The preferred size of a fillet in the U.S. market corresponds to juvenile fish that haven't had a chance to reproduce," says conservation biologist Peter Mous, director of the Nature Conservancy's Indonesia Fisheries...

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Why Are So Many Farmers Markets Failing? Because The Market Is Saturated

When the Nipomo Certified Farmers' Market started in 2005, shoppers were eager to purchase fresh fruits and vegetables, as well as pastured meats and eggs, directly from farmers in central California. But the market was small — an average of 16 vendors set up tables every Sunday — making it harder for farmers to sell enough produce to make attending worthwhile. "The market in Santa Maria is 7 miles in one direction [from Nipomo], and the market in Arroyo Grande is 7 miles in the other...

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Surrounded By Military Barracks, Skiers Shred The Himalayan Slopes Of Indian Kashmir

In a Himalayan valley surrounded by military barracks, blasts of artillery fire often reverberate across the icy mountain peaks. This is one of the world's longest-running conflict zones. It's near where India and Pakistan recently traded airstrikes . So it's not unusual to see helicopters buzzing overhead. But on a morning in early February, one particular chopper was not part of the conflict. "I run Kashmir Heliski . We have clients from different parts of the world. We take people to 4,500...

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