Inland Empire Community News

San Bernardino County Goes To Court Against Employees Seeking Treatment After 2015 Terror Attack

We continue our series of reports this week on why many of the San Bernardino County employees who survived the 2015 terror attack at the Inland Regional Center have had to hire lawyers and take on a years-long battle with San Bernardino County government for disability compensation. San Bernardino County has repeatedly denied many of its employees’ compensation claims for physical, psychological and emotional injuries. The following segment - part 3 in our series by KVCR’s Benjamin Purper -...

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Poll: Amid Kavanaugh Confirmation Battle, Democratic Enthusiasm Edge Evaporates

Just over a month away from critical elections across the country, the wide Democratic enthusiasm advantage that has defined the 2018 campaign up to this point has disappeared, according to a new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll . In July, there was a 10-point gap between the number of Democrats and Republicans saying the November elections were "very important." Now, that is down to 2 points, a statistical tie. Don't see the graphic above? Click here. Democrats' advantage on which party's...

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DHS Watchdog Finds 'Significant' Health And Safety Risks For Immigrants At ICE Center

Two new reports from the Department of Homeland Security's internal watchdog say the agency was unprepared to implement the Trump administration's family separation policy and detail health and safety risks at a California ICE processing facility. Administration officials said its family separation policy was needed to discourage illegal immigration . But President Trump abandoned it amid widespread outrage after more than 2,600 children were separated from their parents. One report from the...

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Inland Empire Economist John Husing

Jan 14, 2014

In his weekly conversation with KVCR's Ken Vincent, Inland Empire Economic Partnership Chief Economist John Husing explains why government deficits are not always a bad thing.

Inland Empire Economist John Husing

Jan 14, 2014

In his weekly conversation with KVCR's Ken Vincent, Inland Empire Economic Partnership Chief Economist John Husing explains why government deficits are not always a bad thing.

Palestinian Rights Activist Omar Barghouti

Jan 14, 2014

KVCR's Ken Vincent speaks with Palestinian Rights Activist Omar Barghouti, who will speak at UC Riverside today, urging support for his effort to get western nations --including the U.S. -- to boycott Israel, divest financial holdings that benefit Israel, and place sanctions on the Israeli government,  because of its treatment of Palestinians living in the West Bank and Gaza Strip

Palestinian Rights Activist Omar Barghouti

Jan 14, 2014

KVCR's Ken Vincent speaks with Palestinian Rights Activist Omar Barghouti, who will speak at UC Riverside today, urging support for his effort to get western nations --including the U.S. -- to boycott Israel, divest financial holdings that benefit Israel, and place sanctions on the Israeli government,  because of its treatment of Palestinians living in the West Bank and Gaza Strip

Palestinian Rights Activist Omar Barghouti

Jan 14, 2014

KVCR's Ken Vincent speaks with Palestinian Rights Activist Omar Barghouti, who will speak at UC Riverside today, urging support for his effort to get western nations --including the U.S. -- to boycott Israel, divest financial holdings that benefit Israel, and place sanctions on the Israeli government,  because of its treatment of Palestinians living in the West Bank and Gaza Strip

San Bernardino Mayoral Candidates Differ on Issues

Jan 13, 2014

The two candidates competing for Mayor of San Bernardino in the February 4th election squared off in a League of Women Votes debate last week that stressed the differences between the candidates on important issues. KVCR's Matt Guilhem attended the forum and has a report. Photo Credit: LaFonzo Carter-San Bernardino Sun Staff Photographer

San Bernardino Mayoral Candidates Differ on Issues

Jan 13, 2014

The two candidates competing for Mayor of San Bernardino in the February 4th election squared off in a League of Women Votes debate last week that stressed the differences between the candidates on important issues. KVCR's Matt Guilhem attended the forum and has a report. Photo Credit: LaFonzo Carter-San Bernardino Sun Staff Photographer

San Bernardino Mayoral Candidates Differ on Issues

Jan 13, 2014

The two candidates competing for Mayor of San Bernardino in the February 4th election squared off in a League of Women Votes debate last week that stressed the differences between the candidates on important issues. KVCR's Matt Guilhem attended the forum and has a report. Photo Credit: LaFonzo Carter-San Bernardino Sun Staff Photographer

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff

Jan 10, 2014

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff and KVCR's Ken Vincent review a few of the top Inland Empire news stories of the past week, including: - Norco ("Horsetown USA") considers luring a horse-racing off-track betting facility to the city; - Orange growers fear the citrus psyllid may spell the end of Inland Empire groves; - Bus crashes like the one that killed eight people in Mentone last year are spurring a crackdown on tour bus companies.

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff

Jan 10, 2014

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff and KVCR's Ken Vincent review a few of the top Inland Empire news stories of the past week, including: - Norco ("Horsetown USA") considers luring a horse-racing off-track betting facility to the city; - Orange growers fear the citrus psyllid may spell the end of Inland Empire groves; - Bus crashes like the one that killed eight people in Mentone last year are spurring a crackdown on tour bus companies.

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Just In From NPR:

A federal court in California has blocked the Trump administration from terminating the Temporary Protected Status program that allows immigrants from four countries to live and work in the United States.

The ruling issued late Wednesday by U.S. District Judge Edward M. Chen Wednesday affects more than 300,000 immigrants enrolled in TPS from El Salvador, Nicaragua, Haiti and Sudan.

TPS was created by Congress in 1990 to allow people from countries suffering civil conflict or natural disasters to remain in the U.S. temporarily.

For almost a century, General Electric was a powerhouse of the American economy, a byword for progress, innovation, and excellence.

GE did everything, from light bulbs to jet engines to medical devices to banking. And it was that last little venture that turned out to be a bridge too far. GE got into the business just ahead of the financial crisis, and once the dust from that debacle had settled, GE found itself more than a little dinged up. A decade later, the company still hasn't recovered. Today on The Indicator, we find out what brought GE to its knees.

Episode 680: Anatomy Of A Scam

8 hours ago

Note: This episode originally ran in January 2016.

The ads are on telephone poles across America: "Work from home. Make thousands of dollars a week. Call this number!" And all over the internet, now, too. Today on the show, we find out what happens when you decide, yeah, that sounds pretty good. It's the story of a scam that will not die. We have secret documents laying out how it all works. And recordings of actual phone calls.

As a researcher looks on, a lemur takes a long whiff of a fruit growing from a tree in an eastern Madagascar rainforest. It passes the animal's test. The lemur takes a bite.

Seconds later it sniffs at another fruit on the same tree. This time, it's not interested.

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Kavanaugh Confirmation: Trump Mocks Accuser Ford As Senators Await FBI Findings

Republican strategist John Brabender ( @JohnBrabender ) and Democratic strategist and Columbia University lecturer  Karine Jean-Pierre  ( @K_JeanPierre ) join Here & Now s Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson to discuss the latest on Brett Kavanaughs embattled Supreme Court nomination, which has emerged as a point of contention ahead of the midterm elections. Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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How The Chinese Government Works To Censor Debate In Western Democracies

It used to be that the Communist Party focused on censoring free speech primarily inside of China. In recent years, though, China's authoritarian government has tried to censor speech beyond its borders, inside liberal democracies, when speech contradicts the party's line on highly sensitive political issues, such as the status of Tibet and Taiwan. It's part of the party's grand strategy to change the way the world talks about China. The Chinese government has been so effective at...

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Number Of Dead From Indonesia Quake And Tsunami Rises To 1,400

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uuNm6ZX-Zt0 Updated at 5:00 a.m. ET on Wednesday A total picture of the destruction from last week's earthquake and tsunami in Indonesia's island of Sulawesi remains unclear, despite days of efforts to aid the living and recover the dead. The central Sulawesi local government has declared a 14-day state of emergency as those efforts continue. The 7.5 magnitude earthquake struck along the coastal district of Donggala on Friday, causing at least 1,400 deaths,...

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Trump's EPA Moves To Roll Back Regulations On Radiation Exposure, Mercury Emissions

The EPA is moving to weaken regulations on radiation exposure. This comes after the Trump administration also proposed weakening rules on mercury emissions, which come from coal-burning power plants. Last month, the administration rolled back restrictions on methane emissions from oil and gas drilling. Here & Now s Peter ODowd talks with Timothy Cama ( @Timothy_Cama ), energy and environment reporter for The Hill, about some of the environmental regulation rollbacks made since President Trump...

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Going It Solo: The Complicated Financial Lives Of Freelancers

Working on your own can have its rewards, such as being able to set your own hours. But being self-employed also brings with it the headache of handling taxes — something a traditional employer normally does. "It's just excruciatingly difficult to manage our finances," says P. Kim Bui, who has been a freelance consultant off and on for two years. In addition to the Web design and social media work she's hired to do, she must also manage all her own office functions, from accounting to payroll...

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U.S. Ends 1955 Treaty With Iran, After U.N. Court Orders A Partial Lift Of Sanctions

Updated at 12:45 p.m. ET The U.N.'s top court gave a partial victory to Iran in its dispute with the U.S. on Wednesday, saying the U.S. "must remove" sanctions that could stop food, medical supplies and other humanitarian products from entering Iran. In response, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said that because of continuing disputes with Iran, "I am therefore announcing today that the United States is terminating the Treaty of Amity with Iran" — referring to the 1955 treaty that laid out...

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West and Pacific Rim

Tesla Hits Production Goal Amid Musk Securities Fraud Controversy

Teslas stock bumped higher Wednesday morning following reports the company had hit a key production goal for its Model 3. Meanwhile, CEO Elon Musk has threatened to leave the company if it were to settle with the Securities and Exchange Commission over securities fraud. Here & Now s Peter ODowd talks with CNN Money correspondent Clare Sebastian ( @ClareCNN ). Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Politics From NPR

Should The Process Of How Judicial Nominees Are Evaluated Change?

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. AILSA CHANG, HOST: The political firestorm over Brett Kavanaugh has raised lots of questions about how judicial nominees are evaluated. But could it lead to changes in the process? NPR national justice correspondent Carrie Johnson has been posing those sorts of questions to lawyers who've been responsible for vetting judges. Carrie joins us now. Hey, Carrie. CARRIE JOHNSON, BYLINE: Hi, Ailsa. CHANG: So potential judges already have...

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Science, Technology, And Medicine From NPR

Nobel Prize In Chemistry Awarded To 3 Scientists, Including 2 Americans

The Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded Wednesday to three researchers whose work has harnessed the power of evolution. Two American scientists, Frances Arnold and George Smith, and one British scientist, Gregory Winter, are sharing the prize. Here & Now s Peter ODowd speaks with Peter Dorhout   ( @PeterDorhoutACS ), vice president for research at Kansas State University at Kansas State University and president of the American Chemical Society. Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http:/...

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Scientists Find What Could Be A History-Making Moon

Scientists may have detected the first moon orbiting a planet in a far-off solar system, though they caution that they still want to confirm the finding with another round of telescope observations. "The fact is, it's so strange and it's the first of its kind," says David Kipping , an astronomer at Columbia University. "That demands a higher level of rigor and skepticism than you would normally apply to a run-of-the-mill detection." Still, he and colleague Alex Teachey say in the journal...

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Education From NPR

Facial Recognition Technology In Schools Prompts Privacy Questions

Facial recognition technology is becoming more common, and is making its way into public places including schools. Carolyn Adolph ( @carolynadolph ) of KUOW takes a look at concerns about how it could be used . Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Arts, Culture, And Media From NPR

NPR's Movie Preview: 15 New Films To Watch — And Watch Out For — This Fall

Fall is often the most intense movie season of all. Awards contenders begin to come into focus after the Toronto International Film Festival, while comedies and thrillers continue to hit screens. We got to see a lot of upcoming films at TIFF — below you'll find write-ups of 15 movies we really enjoyed and a heads-up about nearly 40 notable releases. From Mary Poppins to Aquaman to the possibility of another Oscars faceoff between directors Damien Chazelle ( La La Land ) and Barry Jenkins (...

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Prince Fans Get First Look At His Vault With 'Piano & A Microphone 1983'

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. AILSA CHANG, HOST: It's been more than two years since Prince died. Now, fans are getting their first album-length glimpse into his famed vault. (SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "PURPLE RAIN") PRINCE: (Singing) Never meant to be cause you any sorrow, never meant to cause you pain. I only wanted one time to see you laughing, yeah. I only want to see you in the purple rain (ph). CHANG: That's a demo from "Piano & A Microphone 1983." The album...

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Food, Nutrition, and Cuisine From NPR

Southern Diet Blamed For High Rates Of Hypertension Among Black Americans

Barbecued pork or fried chicken served with a heaping side of mac and cheese or creamy potato salad, sweet tea and peach cobbler — these Southern classics, loaded with as much history as flavor, have become comfort foods for Americans from all over. But a study published Tuesday in The Journal of the American Medical Association suggests that Southern cuisine isn't serving African-Americans, whose ancestors imagined and perfected it, very well. The Southern diet may be at the center of a...

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The Supreme Court Is A Musical Muse For 'Radiolab' Host Jad Abumrad

Dolly Parton , Devendra Banhart , Flor de Toloache and They Might Be Giants all contributed original songs to a new compilation called 27: The Most Perfect Album . They were invited by Jad Abumrad and his team at " More Perfect ," a Radiolab spin-off series which explores how Supreme Court decisions affect people's lives. All the songs on 27: The Most Perfect Album are inspired by amendments to the United States Constitution. Some songs are history lessons, some are abstract explorations and...

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