Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

The Roman Catholic Church in Australia has rejected a recommendation that priests be required to report evidence of sexual abuse revealed in confession.

The proposed change was contained in a landmark report on child sex abuse in the country issued late last year by a royal commission that spent five years compiling data, including interviews of thousands of people who said they were victims of abuse.

Sen. John McCain's flag-draped casket arrived at Joint Base Andrews outside Washington, D.C., late Thursday, where the former presidential candidate will lie in state at the Capitol rotunda following similar honors in Phoenix.

Ordinary citizens will be among those who pay their respects to the Arizona Republican, as will his longtime congressional colleagues.

Colin Kaepernick's allegation that the NFL colluded to deny him a contract as punishment for his lead role in player protests will get a formal hearing after an arbitrator denied the league's request for a summary judgment.

Kaepernick's lawyer, Mark Geragos, tweeted out a photo of the letter received from arbitrator Stephen Burbank on Thursday. ESPN reports that the league declined to comment.

President Trump appears to be blaming China for derailing a U.S.-North Korea rapprochement, implying that it's placing "tremendous pressure" on Pyongyang as a result of ongoing trade disputes between Washington and Beijing.

In a quartet of tweets on Wednesday, Trump issued what he called a White House statement saying he "feels strongly that North Korea is under tremendous pressure from China because of our major trade disputes with the Chinese Government."

A jury in Texas sentenced former police officer Roy Oliver to 15 years in prison for the murder last year of an unarmed black teenager.

Oliver was a police officer in the Dallas suburb of Balch Springs when the shooting took place in April of last year. He and his partner responded to reports of underage drinking. Oliver fired his weapon five times at a moving vehicle. Jordan Edwards, 15, in the front passenger seat, was shot in the head and killed.

French and British fishing crews skirmished in the English Channel on Tuesday, throwing stones and ramming each other's boats — the latest in a long-running row over scallop catches.

U.N. human rights experts say that the Saudi-led, Western-backed coalition fighting in Yemen may have committed war crimes by conducting indiscriminate airstrikes on civilians.

In a report for the United Nations Human Rights Council, the experts also detailed incidents of rape, torture, disappearances and recruitment of child soldiers, carried out by both the coalition – which also includes the United Arab Emirates and the government of Yemen — as well as the Iran-allied Houthi rebels they are fighting.

China's first domestically built aircraft carrier has reportedly begun its final sea trials before commissioning, after which it will take its place as a centerpiece in the country's growing blue-water navy.

The carrier, which was launched last April and had its maiden voyage in May, has yet to be named but carries the official designation of Type 001A.

Hundreds of right-wing demonstrators took to the streets in the eastern German city of Chemnitz to demand that foreigners leave the country following the arrest of two migrants in a fatal stabbing incident.

The protesters — some masked and thrusting Hitler salutes — chanted "Close the borders!" and carried signs that read "Stop the asylum flood."

"This is our city!" they also chanted.

Left-wing counterprotesters demanded "Nazis out!"

Greece has successfully completed its final three-year installment of an international bailout program, allowing it to reclaim a degree of control over its finances, which have been overseen since 2010 by the European Union, European Central Bank and International Monetary Fund.

Athens exits its third bailout on Monday after a protracted debt crisis that forced it to implement painful austerity measures — including deep cuts to social welfare programs — to receive emergency loans.

Health officials have determined that a type of bacteria found in food left at unsafe temperatures is the cause of an outbreak of gastrointestinal illness that struck 647 people who ate last month at a Chipotle Mexican Grill restaurant in Ohio.

Between July 26 and July 30, customers of a Chipotle restaurant in Powell, Ohio, just north of Columbus, complained of food poisoning and diarrhea after eating tacos and burrito bowls there.

Updated at 8:51 a.m. ET

More than 70 people overdosed in or around a historic Connecticut park near the Yale University campus on Wednesday after receiving what authorities believe was synthetic marijuana laced with the powerful opioid fentanyl. Although there have been no deaths, at least two people suffered life-threatening symptoms, according to authorities.

Australia's prime minister has condemned a fringe party lawmaker who called for a return to racially based immigration policies and invoked the term "final solution" in a speech before Parliament.

Malcolm Turnbull, who faces voters next year, joined all of Australia's major parties in rejecting the remarks by Queensland Sen. Fraser Anning, who is the only member of the federal Senate from the far-right Katter's Australian Party.

North Korea is renewing its harsh criticism of the United States for failing to live up to the spirit of the Singapore summit, but Pyongyang is sparing President Trump as it blames "some high-level officials" within the administration.

The foreign ministry said in a statement on Thursday that the U.S. should not expect North Korea to follow through on promises to denuclearize as long as Washington adheres to "old scenarios" that have failed in the past.

Updated at 10:30 a.m. ET

Several NFL players knelt, raised fists or simply refused to take the field during the playing of the national anthem as a controversial protest against police brutality dragged into the 2018 preseason.

As The Associated Press reports, in Philadelphia, Eagles safety Malcolm Jenkins, who suspended his protest last December, and cornerback De'Vante Bausby, raised their fists while defensive end Chris Long stood with his arm around Jenkins' shoulder.

First lady Melania Trump's Slovenian-born parents were sworn in as U.S. citizens Thursday, benefiting from a path to citizenship known as family-based immigration that the president and others have derisively dubbed "chain migration."

Viktor and Amalija Knavs, both in their 70s, attended a private swearing-in ceremony in Manhattan, according to their lawyer, Michael Wildes, who said the couple had "travailed a wonderful journey" to become Americans.

The Senate in predominately Roman Catholic Argentina has rejected a law that would have legalized abortion, rebuffing a grass-roots abortion-rights movement.

Senate lawmakers voted 38 to 31 against the measure, which would have allowed abortion for the first 14 weeks of pregnancy.

Israeli jets pounded targets in the Gaza Strip early Thursday, reportedly killing three people after Palestinian militants fired a barrage of rockets into Israel.

The Gaza Health Ministry said a pregnant woman, her 18-month-old child and a Hamas militant were killed. The Palestinian news agency WAFA cited health officials as confirming that a dozen other Palestinians were wounded in the airstrikes.

Updated at 4 a.m. ET

Bowing to congressional pressure, the Trump administration has announced new sanctions to punish Russia for a nerve agent attack in the U.K. on former spy Sergei Skripal.

Officials in California are warning that it will likely be September before they are able to contain the Mendocino Complex Fire — the largest in the state's history that has already scorched an area the size of Los Angeles.

Cal Fire pushed back its estimate for containment by two weeks for the massive blaze, which is made up of the adjacent River and Ranch fires. Officials had previously anticipated full containment by Aug. 15, but now say it will be Sept. 1.

HGTV is the winning bidder for the Studio City, Calif., house featured in the sitcom The Brady Bunch, with the cable network's parent company promising to "restore the home to its 1970s glory."

The CEO of Discovery Inc., which recently completed acquisition of HGTV, announced the news on a corporate earnings call.

Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro has accused opposition lawmakers of playing a role in a failed attempt to assassinate him over the weekend.

During a nationally televised address to Venezuelan troops on Saturday, Maduro was unhurt when explosives-laden drones exploded near the podium.

In a speech on Tuesday, Maduro said Julio Borges, a prominent opposition leader living in exile in neighboring Colombia, was a co-conspirator in the plot, but he did not elaborate on what role the politician had played.

Updated at 6:10 a.m. ET

Voters in Missouri have overwhelmingly rejected a right-to-work law passed by the state's Republican-controlled Legislature that would have banned compulsory union fees — a resounding victory for organized labor that spent millions of dollars to defeat the measure.

With about 98 percent of the precincts reporting, the "no" vote on Missouri's Proposition A, which supported the law, was running about 67 percent, with nearly 33 percent voting "yes."

A top Syrian weapons engineer killed over the weekend when a bomb in his car exploded was the victim of a targeted assassination by Israel's spy agency, The New York Times reports.

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket lit up the sky around Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida early Tuesday with a successful launch, placing an Indonesian telecommunications satellite into orbit and demonstrating the reusability of the company's upgraded booster.

Hoping to escape Hong Kong's summer temperatures, more people are settling into the city's numerous 24-hour McDonald's restaurants to soak in the air conditioning and get a decent night's sleep.

A new survey finds that the number of "McRefugees" or "McSleepers" — as they've been dubbed — has increased sixfold in the past five years.

Police in rural New Mexico have rescued 11 children living in what authorities have described as a squalid compound after receiving a tip that they were "starving."

The children, ranging in age from 1 to 15, were removed from the compound in the small community of Amalia, near the New Mexico-Colorado border, about 145 miles northeast of Albuquerque.

Actor Charlotte Rae, best known for her role as Mrs. Garrett, the patient housemother at a girls' school in the 1980s sitcom The Facts of Life, has died at age 92.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo says the White House is ready to enforce sanctions against Iran that will be re-imposed starting Monday — an effort by the U.S. to "push back" against Tehran's "malign activity."

The renewed sanctions follow President Trump's decision in May to withdraw the U.S. from the multi-nation nuclear accord with Tehran. The 2015 agreement, known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, of JCPOA, brought a suspension of U.S. sanctions in exchange for Tehran's agreement to end its nuclear and ballistic missile programs.

Editor's Note: This story contains graphic language.

A former worker at a shelter for immigrant youths in Arizona has been accused of molesting eight teenage boys over a nearly yearlong period at the facility, according to federal records cited by nonprofit news site ProPublica.

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