Rosenstein Remains Deputy Attorney General Following White House Meeting — For Now

Updated at 1:32 p.m. ET Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein remained in his job on Monday afternoon after a visit to the White House that sparked a flurry of reports suggesting he might resign or be fired. A person close to Rosenstein said he was expecting to be fired after the New York Times story on Friday about his early tenure in office. Ultimately, he was not removed, but the White House did say after his meeting that Rosenstein would return on Thursday for another meeting then with...

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Just In From NPR:

International charities are reeling after Panama revoked the registration for a search-and-rescue ship they say is the only one of its kind in the central Mediterranean used to save migrants in danger. They say it amounts to a death sentence for hundreds of people trying to reach safety.

NPR is looking at when and why obstetricians and gynecologists put their patients on bed rest. If you've been pregnant in the past year and were advised to stay on bed rest, we would like to hear from you.

A reporter may reach out to you to follow up on your response. Share your thoughts with us below.

For the first time, scientists have demonstrated that a controversial new kind of genetic engineering can rapidly spread a self-destructive genetic modification through a complex species.

We continue our series, "State of the Cities," in which we're talking with Inland Empire mayors about how their cities are doing economically following the Great Recession. In this segment, KVCR's Ken Vincent speaks with Palm Springs Mayor Steve Pougnet about how the growing stature of Palm Springs International Film Festival is affecting the city's recovering economy.

We continue our series, "State of the Cities," in which we're talking with Inland Empire mayors about how their cities are doing economically following the Great Recession. In this segment, KVCR's Ken Vincent speaks with Palm Springs Mayor Steve Pougnet about how the growing stature of Palm Springs International Film Festival is affecting the city's recovering economy.

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff

Jan 3, 2014

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff

Jan 3, 2014

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff

Jan 3, 2014

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff

Dec 20, 2013

P-E Colmnist Cassie MacDuff and KVCR's Ken Vincent review some of the week's top news stories, including: -San Beranrdino County will no longer place "Immigration Holds" on undocumented immigrants with minor criminal convictions; -San Bernardino County will allow an exhibition of paintings to be displayed in a county building, in spite of complaints about images of female nudity; -a review of Riverside Mayor Rusty Bailey's first year in office.

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff

Dec 20, 2013

P-E Colmnist Cassie MacDuff and KVCR's Ken Vincent review some of the week's top news stories, including: -San Beranrdino County will no longer place "Immigration Holds" on undocumented immigrants with minor criminal convictions; -San Bernardino County will allow an exhibition of paintings to be displayed in a county building, in spite of complaints about images of female nudity; -a review of Riverside Mayor Rusty Bailey's first year in office.

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff

Dec 20, 2013

P-E Colmnist Cassie MacDuff and KVCR's Ken Vincent review some of the week's top news stories, including: -San Beranrdino County will no longer place "Immigration Holds" on undocumented immigrants with minor criminal convictions; -San Bernardino County will allow an exhibition of paintings to be displayed in a county building, in spite of complaints about images of female nudity; -a review of Riverside Mayor Rusty Bailey's first year in office.

Inland Empire Economist John Husing

Dec 17, 2013

John Husing, the Chief Economist for the Inland Empire Economic Partnership, talks with KVCR's Ken Vincent about how the Federal Reserve controls inflation.

Inland Empire Economist John Husing

Dec 17, 2013

John Husing, the Chief Economist for the Inland Empire Economic Partnership, talks with KVCR's Ken Vincent about how the Federal Reserve controls inflation.

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One Year After The Las Vegas Shooting, 2 Survivors Remember

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