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As Migrant Caravan Winds North, Trump Vows To Cut Aid To Countries They're Fleeing

Updated at 2:59 p.m. ET As a vast train of migrants treks across Mexico, fleeing violence and poverty for the fate that awaits them at the U.S. border, President Trump is vowing that there will be repercussions for the countries that have allowed their passage. "Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador were not able to do the job of stopping people from leaving their country and coming illegally to the U.S.," Trump tweeted Monday . "We will now begin cutting off, or substantially reducing, the...

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'Extremely Threatening' Hurricane Willa Heads For Mexico's Pacific Coast

Updated 8:47 p.m. ET Hurricane Willa, an "extremely dangerous" storm heading to Mexico's Pacific coast, was downgraded from a Category 5 to a Category 4 by the National Hurricane Center on Monday. The storm, with maximum sustained winds of nearly 150 mph, is about 100 miles west from Cabo Corrientes, a municipality in southwest Mexico. It is moving north at 8 mph, according to the NHC's latest advisory. NHC forecasters say the storm is expected to move over or very near Islas Marias on...

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Today is the deadline to register to vote in the Nov. 6 election in California.  Capital Public Radio's Kacey Gardner has more onhow to get registered before the end of the day.

marijuanaandbusiness.com

The Riverside County Board of Supervisors will vote Tuesday on whether to license and regulate commercial marijuana businesses in the county's unincorporated areas.  KVCR's Ken Vincent has more.

KABC

Former President Barack Obama and former First Lady Michelle Obama paid a visit to Southern California yesterday before heading to Nevada to campaign for Democrats.  More from KVCR's Ken Vincent.

Longtime Inland Empire journalist and KVCR contributor Cassie MacDuff and KVCR's Ken Vincent review some of the Inland Empire's top news stories this week, including:

usgs.gov

Santa Ana winds will make a return to the Inland Empire today, raising the risk that wildfires could break out.   KVCR's Ken Vincent has more.

canniporium.ca

Canada launched its legal marijuana marketplace this week.  The northern neighbor learned a few lessons from California's rollout.  Capital Public Radio's Julia Mitric reports.

Some of California's sickest children are recovering in hospital beds that aren't seismically compliant, or need new medical equipment.  In November, state residents can vote on a ballot measure that funds these improvements.  Capital Public Radio's Sammy Caiola has more on Proposition 4.

We Fact Check The Feinstein/deLeon Forum

Oct 18, 2018
KQED

Senator Dianne Feinstein and her challenger in California's U.S. Senate race Kevin de Leon made questionable claims yesterday (Wednesday) during their only scheduled forum.  Capital Public Radio's Chris Nichols has this report.

Reform California

Proponents of Propostion 6 - the ballot measure to repeal the gas tax increase - don't have nearly as much money as the No On 6 campaign.  But they can still hold press events.  Like the one yesterday (Tuesday) in Sacramento where backers provided government documents that they say show waste and abuse of state trnasportation dollars.  Capital Public Radio's Nadine Sebai reports.

Labor groups are pushing a ballot measure that would regualte the way that dialysis clinic operators spend money.  Opponents say Propostion 8 goes too far and has the potential to hurt patients.  Capital Public Radios' Sammy Caiola spoke with one expert on what this battle says about the broader health care industry.

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Just In From NPR:

The Supreme Court has temporarily shielded Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross from having to sit for questioning under oath in the lawsuits over a controversial citizenship question the Trump administration added to the 2020 census.

The vice president came to the Kennedy Center last night. That would be HBO's Veep: Julia Louis-Dreyfus.

The 11-time Emmy Award-winner was in Washington, D.C. to accept the Mark Twain Prize for American Humor. Plenty of big names in comedy were there to present it to her.

Julia Louis-Dreyfus grew up in Washington, D.C. She went to Holton-Arms School in Bethesda, Maryland, the same private high school as Christine Blasey Ford — the woman who accused Brett Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting her 36 years ago.

It was Tina Fey who first made the connection.

As a caravan of migrants makes its way through southern Mexico toward the United States, President Trump presses for increased border security. The White House continues to express confidence in Saudi Arabia following new releases about journalist Jamal Khashoggi’s death, while lawmakers from both parties question the Saudi explanation.

Only 16 percent of eligible voters under the age of 30 cast ballots in the 2014 midterm elections. This year, public figures from Taylor Swift to Barack Obama have taken to social media to mobilize young people. But some experts say the long-term solution to low youth turnout is better civics education.

More From NPR

6 Takeaways From Georgia's 'Use It Or Lose It' Voter Purge Investigation

Tens of thousands of Georgians who haven't voted in recent elections may show up at the polls on Nov. 6, only to learn they are no longer registered to vote and cannot cast a ballot. In July 2017, more than half a million people were removed from Georgia's voter rolls. Of those, 107,000 were purged because they had decided not to vote in previous elections and they failed to respond to mailed notices from the state. That's according to an investigation from APM Reports, the podcast and radio...

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'In My Father's House' Explores How Crime Spreads Through Generations

When "Rooster" Bogle — born Dale Vincent Bogle — used to drive by the Oregon State Correctional Institution with his young sons, he'd gaze out at the prison with nostalgia. "Look carefully, because when you grow up, you guys are going to end up there," he told his boys. This wasn't a warning: It was a challenge. And so began the competition for who could be the meanest, baddest Bogle. Crime was a family affair for the Bogle family. Rooster Bogle was arrested for the first time in 1959 at age...

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Costco Builds Nebraska Supply Chain For Its $5 Rotisserie Chickens

A handful of companies — think Tyson and Perdue — all but control poultry production in the U.S. They'll soon be joined by a retailer known more for chicken sales than chicken production: Costco. The warehouse retailer is now building a farm-to-table production system to ensure a steady supply of rotisserie chickens. The center of the operation is currently under construction on the south side of the eastern Nebraska city of Fremont, population about 26,000. Cement trucks come and go as crews...

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What Trump's Threat To End A U.S.-Russia Nuclear Arms Treaty Means For Putin

U.S. National Security Adviser John Bolton arrived in Moscow this weekend to a murmur of dampened outrage over President Trump's announcement to leave the 1987 arms control treaty that marked the end of the Cold War. Mikhail Gorbachev, the former Soviet leader who signed the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty with then-President Ronald Reagan, called the decision a "mistake" that didn't originate from a great mind. While some Russian lawmakers grumbled about "continuing blackmail" and ...

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Earlier From NPR

As Border Restrictions Tighten, Some Experts See Migrant Caravans Growing In Size

Guatemala's president says 2,000 migrants have returned to Honduras following a tense standoff on Friday between the mass caravan they had been traveling in and officers on Mexico's border with Guatemala. The president of Honduras said another 486 members of the convoy were also en route back to Honduras, according to Reuters. The migrants were part of a group of thousands that attempted to cross a border bridge over the Suchiate River along the border between Guatemala and Mexico. Many of...

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Justice Department Expands Tribal Police Help, Calling It 'Right Thing To Do'

Last year, police in Washington state were chasing a lead about an elder abuse case that quickly took a turn toward the criminal. Mark Williams, a veteran detective for the Suquamish Police Department, said he'd learned the nickname of a potential suspect in a kidnapping of a man in his 90s who suffered from poor health — but he needed to find the suspect's real name and address. With a little digging and a few keystrokes, and the help of a Justice Department program that connects Native...

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Meet The Jews Of The German Far Right

A small group of unlikely supporters of the far-right Alternative for Germany (AfD) — a party whose members have been accused of racism and downplaying the Nazis — has launched a new association. It's called "Jews in the AfD." Just 19 members turned up to its launch event in the city of Wiesbaden last month, but the development has unsettled many in Germany's Jewish community. According to police statistics, anti-Semitic attacks are on the rise in Germany. One incident caught on camera late...

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Opinion: A President In Praise Of Strongmen And Dictators

President Trump can be stinging and sarcastic. It's part of his charm, for those who find it charming. He has the audacity of discourtesy, if you please, whether calling a woman "Horseface, " as he did this week, or ridiculing African nations as ... something I quoted on the air only once. But the president reveals a softer side when he talks about strongmen and dictators. He's said there may be "severe" consequences if Saudi leaders ordered the killing of Jamal Khashoggi. But when the...

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Politics From NPR

Ahead Of Midterm Elections, Trump Slams Immigration And Stands By Saudi Arabia

As a caravan of migrants makes its way through southern Mexico toward the United States, President Trump presses for increased border security. The White House continues to express confidence in Saudi Arabia following new releases about journalist Jamal Khashoggis death, while lawmakers from both parties question the Saudi explanation. Here & Now s Jeremy Hobson speaks with NPRs Mara Liasson ( @MaraLiasson ) about the week ahead in politics. Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www...

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West and Pacific Rim

Can't Find An Affordable Home? Try Living In A Pod

The cost of housing is out of reach for many residents in cities such as Los Angeles and Seattle. One solution is called co-living, and it looks a lot like dorm life. Co-living projects are trying to fill a vacuum between low-income and luxury housing in expensive housing markets where people in the middle are left with few choices. Nadya Hewitt lives in a building in Los Angeles run by a company called PodShare, where renters (or "members," in company lingo) occupy "pods." The grand tour of...

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Education From NPR

Is Civics Education The Key To Mobilizing Young Voters?

Only 16 percent of eligible voters under the age of 30 cast ballots in the 2014 midterm elections. This year, public figures from Taylor Swift to Barack Obama have taken to social media to mobilize young people. But some experts say the long-term solution to low youth turnout is better civics education. Here & Now s Peter ODowd speaks with  Nathan Bowling ( @nate_bowling ), who teaches government and human geography at Lincoln High School in Tacoma, Washington, and hosts the Nerd Farmer...

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Science, Technology, And Medicine From NPR

Report: Women Everywhere Don't Know Enough About Ovarian Cancer

A new study of women with ovarian cancer shows that ignorance about the condition is common among patients in all 44 countries surveyed. And that ignorance has a cost. The disease is more treatable, even potentially curable, in its early stages. The women's answers also suggested their doctors were ignorant. Many of them reported that diagnosis took a long time and that they weren't referred to proper specialists. The study was based on an online survey of 1,531 women who had been diagnosed...

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Arts, Culture, And Media From NPR

Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Of 'Veep,' 'Seinfeld' Fame, Receives Mark Twain Prize

The vice president came to the Kennedy Center last night. That would be HBO's Veep : Julia Louis-Dreyfus. The 11-time Emmy Award-winner was in Washington, D.C. to accept the Mark Twain Prize for American Humor. Plenty of big names in comedy were there to present it to her. Julia Louis-Dreyfus grew up in Washington, D.C. She went to Holton-Arms School in Bethesda, Maryland, the same private high school as Christine Blasey Ford — the woman who accused Brett Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting her...

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This 'Halloween,' Jamie Lee Curtis Reckons With 40 Years Of Trauma

Forty years ago, horror fans were introduced to the masked killer Michael Myers, stalker of babysitters in a small Illinois town. The film was, of course, Halloween . And it was the debut of Jamie Lee Curtis, who played the bookish babysitter, Laurie Strode — the original "final girl" character who narrowly escapes the slaughter. Curtis appeared in three more sequels and even died in one. She thought she'd left that character behind. "I had no intention in being another Halloween movie," she...

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Food, Nutrition, and Cuisine From NPR

What's Cookin', Kiddo? America's Test Kitchen Unveils Book For Young Chefs

Eight-year-old Lucy Gray is wide-eyed and quivering with anticipation when I arrive at her house in suburban Maryland. I am sorry to report that I am not the object of her excitement. She is thrilled because she will soon be cooking with my companion, Molly Birnbaum, editor in chief of America's Test Kitchen Kids . America's Test Kitchen has long been a reliable source of advice for home cooks. The kitchen tests tools, techniques and recipes before making recommendations through its TV show,...

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Have You Made Or Tasted Mama Stamberg's Cranberry Relish? Tell Us About It

NPR's annual Thanksgiving recitation of the recipe for Mama Stamberg's cranberry relish is coming up, and we need your help. Susan Stamberg always says her mother-in-law's recipe sounds terrible — but tastes terrific. In addition to cranberries and sugar, it includes onion, sour cream and horseradish. It's tangy, cold and roughly the color of Pepto-Bismol (but, mercifully, not the flavor). This year, Susan wants to know your stories about making the relish, or hating the relish, or not caring...

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Don't Miss:

Sparring Candidates Duet In Music While They Duel For Votes

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nonCEJMOKkU "Society, have mercy on me / I hope you're not angry if I disagree," go the closing lines of "Society" — a three-chord folk song written by Jerry Hannan. Last week, amidst a contentious midterm election season, two aspiring politicians in Vermont performed the song as an elegant aisle-crossing and a rare cross-party collaboration. Immediately following an Oct. 10 debate, held in the Varnum Memorial Library in the village of Jeffersonville, two...

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